How Do We End Sex Trafficking?

How do we put an end to sex trafficking?

By addressing demand.

This basic reality is the foundation to the ultimate solution to sex trafficking. In order to end it we have to end demand for commercial sex.

But how?

Time, testing, and research have demonstrated unequivocally that policies focused on eliminating demand are extremely effective in eliminating sex trafficking.[1] Countries that criminalize the purchase of sex as a felony level offense and de-criminalize the vulnerable women who sell it—and instead offer them help and social services—have seen astounding results. [2]

The Abolition Model criminalizes the act  of buying sex.

This model of legislation that focuses on ending the demand for commercial sex is called the “Abolition Model” and it is the key to eradicating sex trafficking once and for all.

It isn’t enough to merely rescue the exploited—we have to cut off the exploitation industry at its roots. If we hope to one day achieve a world where no one is trafficked or sold for sex, this starts with every country fighting for freedom by adopting the Abolition Model.

"I believe that we will never succeed in combating trafficking in women if we do not simultaneously work to abolish prostitution...” Margareta Winberg Former Deputy Prime Minister of Sweden

It’s time we expose the truth together and create a world of freedom.


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  • Additional footnotes from video
  • [7] UK Home Office (2004) Solutions and Strategies: Drug Problems and Street Sex Markets: London: UK Government
  • [8] Raymond, J., D’Cunha, J., Dzuhayatin, S. R., Hynes, H. P., Ramirez Rodriguez, Z., & Santos, A. (2002). “A comparative study of women trafficked in the migration process: Patterns, profiles and health consequences of sexual exploitation in five countries (Indonesia, the Philippines, Thailand, Venezuela and the United States)”. N. Amherst, MA: Coalition Against Trafficking in Women (CATW). Retrieved March 15, 2003, from http://action.web.ca/home/catw/readingroom.shtml?x=17062
  • [9] Vanwesenbeeck, I. (1994) Prostitutes' Well-Being and Risk. VU University Press, Amsterdam.