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Our New Film Rips the Mask Off the Porn Industry


Help this film impact the masses with the truth about the porn industry’s rampant human rights abuses! Give to our year-end campaign today and help us reach our $250,000 goal.

Give Freedom

“And then we just lay it on harder and I lay it on harder and I lay it on harder, until they snap—until we find the end. So I am guilty of that, I push to the maximum, to the absolute limit. And some women I have pushed over the limit, I agree.” —Porn Producer/Performer

We had to pick our jaws up off the floor after hearing statements like these from some of the mainstream porn industry’s most profitable and notable producers and performers. Shockingly enough, this was captured in a filmed interview for our latest docuseries The XXX Factor.

Many people understand that porn can be harmful on a number of levels. But most people don’t seem to know what’s really going on behind the closed doors of porn studios. We knew that to tell this story accurately would require venturing into the heart of the industry itself. We would need to have honest conversations directly with those who are creating this deeply disturbing content for BILLIONS of viewers around the world.

One porn site alone boasted 42 billion visits in 2019, an average of 115 million per day. That’s equivalent to the populations of Canada, Australia, Poland, and the Netherlands visiting this single porn site in one day.1

Several important studies found that the average age of first exposure to porn is 10-11 years old!2 Porn has become the sex education of our youth.

Our film team went to the front lines, interviewing pornographers and going to pornography conventions in order to expose the truth of this abusive and exploitative industry.

During another interview, a producer confessed, “they don’t tell you in the credits that ya know, this actress had to have surgery to repair damages done to her body by the scene that you just thought was so erotic.”

What we discovered shook us to our core. But the harder it was to film, the more important the documentary became. We were more motivated to bring this injustice to light. What our cameras saw in those environments was the opportunity to tell this story in a way that no one has ever told it before—from the inside.

This film series is designed to be a whistleblower for the tragic coercion, exploitation, and human rights abuses that have become the pillars of a billion-dollar industry.

It offers a rare glimpse into the predatory realities of the industry from those with firsthand experience. With stories exposing huge STD cover-ups, rampant violence against women, and the overt fetishization of children, the content we captured is indeed disturbing—but it will be a wake-up call for a culture that tolerates our pornified world as “normal.”

This film series is designed to be a whistleblower for the tragic coercion, exploitation, and human rights abuses that have become the pillars of a billion-dollar industry.

The series reveals that mainstream porn today is extremely violent, degrading, and dehumanizing. Alarmingly, it is estimatd that 88% of scenes contain physical aggression such as spanking, open-hand slapping, and gagging, primarily aimed at women.3

“I felt shaken in a deep way” our director Benjamin Nolot recalled after a particularly tough interview, in which a pornography producer verbally assaulted him, demanded to see his ID, and accused our film crew of being FBI agents.

“[The porn producer] had an intimidation factor and an intensity about him that even scared me, a 6-foot-4 man with a black belt. How does an 18-year-old girl even have a chance in that context?… What these girls must experience in the violent sexual assaults that take place in these videos is beyond anything I can imagine.”

From the detrimental consequences of childhood exposure, to the connection porn has to sex trafficking, child sexual abuse, and a wide array of other human-rights issues, the proliferation of porn in our modern culture is alarming and urgently needs to be addressed.

Right now pornography is normalized in our cultural narrative. We believe The XXX Factor’s focus on human rights violations in the production of mainstream porn, and its unprecedented access to first-hand interviews from within the porn industry is more necessary than ever in our hypersexualized culture.

This docuseries will rip the mask off the porn industry so that the world will see its true, predatory face. Once people know the truth, change can come. Porn studios can be called to account for their actions. Young prospective performers can be prevented from entering this industry. Those addicted to porn will find fresh and enduring motivation to cut off all porn use. And society, across the globe, can begin to wake up from its delusion that porn is harmless.

After six years, The XXX Factor is complete. We’re currently in talks with major distributors and making decisions on the most effective way to release this film to the world.

But we need your help! In order for this film to have maximum impact on millions of viewers, we need to reach them first. Your gift will help accomplish this by providing crucial funds for promotion and other strategic elements needed for a reverberating film launch. YOU can help this film educate the masses.

For the sake of all who are preyed upon by this billion-dollar industry of sexual exploitation, give to our year-end campaign today and be the bridge to freedom.

Give Freedom

References

  • 1. https://www.pornhub.com/insights/2019-year-in-review
  • 2. David L. Burton, George Stuart Leibowitz, and Alan Howard, “Comparison by crime type of juvenile delinquents on pornography exposure: The absence of relationships between exposure to pornography and sexual offense characteristics,” Journal of Forensic Nursing 6, no. 3 (September 2010): 121-129: Gloria Cowan and Robin R. Campbell, “Rape causal attitudes among adolescents,” Journal of Sex Research 32, no. 2 (1995): 145-153: A. Cowell, and E. Smith, Streetwise pornography research (Newcastle upon Tyne: Streetwise Young People’s Project, 2009); inHorvath et al., “Basically… Porn Is Everywhere”, 24.
  • 3. https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/1077801210382866